Where Pianos Roam http://sett.com/wherepianosroam The Official Blog of Gordon Roqué en-us Fri, 22 Jun 2018 08:56:59 +0000 http://sett.com Sett RSS Generator The Weekly Pic Pick: Acoustic Vs. Electric http://sett.com/wherepianosroam/the-weekly-pic-pick-acoustic-vs-electric Since this is a blog called "Where Pianos Roam", I thought it would be appropriate to have an image of pianos for the first ever Weekly Pic Pick!!!

The other day, I was rehearsing with my drummer Benjamin Stix, guitarist Tony Youngblood, and horn player Jamison Sevitts. We were jamming and brainstorming arrangement ideas for one of the songs for the album.

I think I had the best seat in the house. It was on a cozy little piano bench sandwiched between a gorgeous upright piano and my faithful (and very portable) stage keyboard. I felt like a little Asian buffer between the old world of the past and a funky, newer dimension. Sigh . . .

We had a fun session, and I could have sat there all day playing my heart out.

I think I will always favor an acoustic piano over an electric one. You just can't fabricate the depth, authenticity, and richness of a real piano. Nonetheless, the portability and mixture of different sounds that an electric keyboard/synthesizer can give are worth their weight in awesomeness!!

Another lovely Weekly Pic Pick arrives next week!!!

-Gordon

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Sun, 05 May 2013 22:33:01 +0000 http://sett.com/wherepianosroam/the-weekly-pic-pick-acoustic-vs-electric
New Segments on WPR: Creativity and The Weekly Pic Pick http://sett.com/wherepianosroam/new-segments-on-wpr-creativity-and-the-weekly-pic-pick There are two new segments I wanted to add to my regular roster of posts here at WPR. First off, there will be a new segment called Creativity. I want to discuss and explore the process of creativity across numerous platforms. In my case, I play piano, sing, perform show]]>

There are two new segments I wanted to add to my regular roster of posts here at WPR.

First off, there will be a new segment called Creativity. I want to discuss and explore the process of creativity across numerous platforms. In my case, I play piano, sing, perform shows, write songs, write poetry, run this blog, draw, take photos, knit, and do a bit of web design, and so the creative process seems to permeate through my entire life. How does the creative process differ between various forms of expression? How is it the same? How does one stay motivated and inspired? These are all questions I hope to find answers to. I'd also like to interview other creative people across various fields and see how they feel about what they do. This should be fun.

Secondly, I'll be doing a new weekly segment called The Weekly Pic Pick. Over the last few years, I've been growing more and more interested in photography. Now that I have both a very good digital camera as well as a solid cell phone camera, I'll be posting one new pic per week from my adventures out and about in my life. Whether it's something striking, humorous, or just very editorial, I'll be posting the best of what I've photographed every week.

These new segments, in addition to my book reviews (Reading Will Save the World), thoughts on current events, and posts about simplicity and simple living, will begin over the next couple of weeks.

What's going on in your world?

-Gordon

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Sat, 27 Apr 2013 12:37:18 +0000 http://sett.com/wherepianosroam/new-segments-on-wpr-creativity-and-the-weekly-pic-pick
New Changes at WPR http://sett.com/wherepianosroam/new-changes-at-wpr This is just a quick announcement to say that my official blog, WPR, is currently undergoing a migration to a new, community-based blog-hosting platform. There will still be all of the usual posts like my book reviews, new album updates, thoughts on current events, and m]]>

This is just a quick announcement to say that my official blog, WPR, is currently undergoing a migration to a new, community-based blog-hosting platform. There will still be all of the usual posts like my book reviews, new album updates, thoughts on current events, and my usual amount of quirky weirdness, but there will be a couple of new features on this site starting very soon.

In the meantime, come on by and check out our new digs.

Thanks for reading!!

-Gordon

Official Website: www.gordonroque.com
Listen to Music: www.gordonroque.com/music
Facebook: www.facebook.com/gordonroque
Twitter: www.twitter.com/gordonroque

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Sun, 21 Apr 2013 23:40:38 +0000 http://sett.com/wherepianosroam/new-changes-at-wpr
My Thoughts on Gay Marriage http://sett.com/wherepianosroam/uid/53482 As a gay man, I've never quite known what to think about marriage.   It has always been just something that was available to someone else. Sure, I've fantasized about what my wedding could look like, but I've never believed those dreams. I see other people, wi]]> marriage

As a gay man, I've never quite known what to think about marriage.   It has always been just something that was available to someone else.

Sure, I've fantasized about what my wedding could look like, but I've never believed those dreams.

I see other people, with their wedding rings and anniversaries and honey moons and government-approved benefits, but I've always stood outside of such an existence,  applauding what they've done as I look on and keep my respectful distance.

Don't get me wrong, I believe in equal rights and justice, but when you've lived a life being told that you can't be a certain way or do certain things, you can't help but internalize the sorrow of what this means.

So, then, what is the sorrow of what this means?

It's hard to eloquently answer this question even though I know the answer well.  As such, I must refer to a voice that has paid a far greater price than I have.

To hear this voice, watch this:

IT COULD HAPPEN TO YOU

Thank you for watching this video.

Now that you have heard this voice, what would you do if the life you lived with the one person you loved was discounted?  Dishonored?  Cruelly diminished?

All those memories.  All that joy.  AS IF IT NEVER HAPPENED.

What would you do if you couldn't be at your own wife or husband's funeral?  Or even be there by their side during the final stages of life?

How would you stand it?  For myself, the idea that someone could take this away from me is unimaginable.

I can tell you that I couldn't stand it.

This would break my heart.

I don't know if any amount of consoling could comfort this kind of experience.

This is the sorrow of what this means.

The struggle for marriage equality is not just about gay rights and marriage benefits.

It's about respecting and protecting a person's capacity to love someone.

By what god and what sense of justice does anyone have a right to lessen and weaken the  love and life that someone else has bravely lived?  Please answer this question for yourself, if you can.  Painfully, I know that there are many answers to be given.

For myself, I can only walk my own path and carry the load that I carry.  I look on at the happiness of others and truly wish them well, even though I may never really know what that kind of happiness feels like.  This is the sorrow of what this means.

So there you have it.  I stand in support of gay marriage.  I stand by this because the sorrow of what all of this means is too heavy, too unbearable, a load to carry.

It's the kind of load that will break me, and I do not ever wish to be broken.

-Gordon

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Wed, 03 Apr 2013 01:41:20 +0000 http://sett.com/wherepianosroam/uid/53482
Reading Will Save the World: The Grapes of Wrath http://sett.com/wherepianosroam/uid/53480 (SPOILER ALERT!! If you plan on reading The Grapes of Wrath some time in the near future. Do not read this post.) According to dictionary(dot)com, the word "struggle" is defined as such: To contend with an adversary or foe. To be coping with inability to perform well or w]]>

(SPOILER ALERT!! If you plan on reading The Grapes of Wrath some time in the near future. Do not read this post.)

According to dictionary(dot)com, the word "struggle" is defined as such:

To contend with an adversary or foe.

To be coping with inability to perform well or win

To contend with difficulty

The word "struggle" was all I could think of after reading John Steinbeck's Nobel and Pulitzer-prize winning book The Grapes of Wrath.  Outside of this, it was so overwhelming that I was at a loss for what to really think about it.

It's story, about the Joad family's desperate migration westward during the Great Depression era of  America, has a deep richness to it.  It is so rich that you can mine through it's pages and easily interpret layers upon layers of meaning and symbolism.  I have read a couple of Steinbeck's other books, and true to form, The Grapes of Wrath displays his masterful ability to make grand, sweeping statements about all kinds of things in the simplest, most unassuming ways.  I drew several insights out of this book.

In one sense, Grapes offers a bitterly hard lesson in economics.  When there is a huge supply of people willing to work for any amount of money, no matter how little, coupled with a conversely small amount of people able to pay for such labor, what you have is a terrible situation where the destitute and poor subsist on chump change.  The wealthy employers increase their profit margins by paying laborers next to nothing (and get away with it) while everyone else languishes in starvation and poverty.   Capitalism, as it sows its seeds of greed, can be cruel and heartbreaking.

In another sense, this book is draped with multiple layers of biblical references, the most obvious to me being the mass migration of a people to a Promised Land, aka California.  This story is largely allegorical in its tone and doesn't pretend to be subtle about it.

I also  found the close-knit bonds within the Joad family to be particularly poignant.  There are several instances in this story that display what it means to protect and stand by the people you love.  Seeing how they sustained each other in the face of such terrible misfortune was my favorite part of this book.

Ultimately, however, the most compelling part of this story to me was its struggle.  It is the deep undercurrent in a wide, seething, swirling ocean--tugging and pushing against every smaller current above it.

The struggle of a family to travel 2000 miles through the midwest, mountains, and deserts.

The struggle of twelve people crammed into a make-shift, almost broken-down pick-up truck to leave all that they knew behind for something better.

The struggle when discovering that hardships are no different even in places where the grass is greener.

The struggle to question and fight authority.

The struggle against starvation.

The struggle against the grief of losing someone you love.

The struggle to survive when all you have is nothing.

To me, the story of The Grapes of Wrath is less about presenting a moral or lesson, but more about conveying a sense of what it means to struggle against hopelessness, to grapple with something so insurmountable that it hurts..  It paints a vivid picture of what this looks like.  Where a thin film of dust settles itself everywhere, like soil filling a grave.  Where the heat is intoxicating and inescapable.  Where one's hunger is endless.  Where the tears will fall where they will, impervious to every herculean effort to hold them back.

As difficult as it was to read this book, I understood the importance of what it had to say.  I know now why this book has been studied and praised all the world over.  It's beauty does not exist in some high and lofty place.  Oh no.  It's beauty lives in something raw, vital, and painfully human-- in the struggle deep inside its bones to hold on to something tender, worthwhile, and real.

-Gordon

PS:  Up next, I am currently reading Lev Grossman's fantastical novel The Magicians, and it is quite an engrossing ride.  More on that in the next installment of Reading Will Save the World.

 

 

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Mon, 25 Mar 2013 13:11:35 +0000 http://sett.com/wherepianosroam/uid/53480
A Birthday for Sophie http://sett.com/wherepianosroam/uid/53481 Back in January, Laurel, one of my best friends in the whole wide world, asked me if I could help decorate her adorable daughter Sophie's 1st Birthday Party as well as do some photography.  The venue was the fellowship hall of an old church in east Nashville.  Dark hardwood floors, high ceilings, and a warm abundance of natural light were the raw materials to work with.  With very little time and an even smaller budget, I helped pull something together that was colorful, sweet, and fun.  Here are some photos from that wonderful day .  .  .

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That's right.  I wanted the birthday table to be really girly and whimsical.  Who would have thought that coffee filters and heart-shaped cookie cutters would do the trick?

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I used these fabric pennants to decorate the food table.

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As centerpieces, I built structures out of the party cups for all of the tables:

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Loved this silhouette:

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Found these little wooden chairs to use as seating for the  small army of VIP's:

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Balloons!!  Balloons!!!

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My friend Laurel, the proud Mama:

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Finally, this is me with the beautiful birthday girl Sophie through the camera on my Windows phone:

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I actually had a ton of fun doing this, and I tend to work best under lots of pressure so it all turned out for the best.

Special thanks to Laurel for letting me do this for her family on this very special day.

I hope that years from now Sophie will see these pics and know how adorable her 1st birthday was.

-Gordon

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Tue, 02 Apr 2013 02:01:14 +0000 http://sett.com/wherepianosroam/uid/53481
Reading Will Save the World: Taoism http://sett.com/wherepianosroam/uid/53479 I cannot ever remember having read a book whose every page resonates with my own personal philosophy towards life.  I think I just found that book.

Back in December, a sweet and dear friend of mine sent me a box of books.  I plan on reading all of these books through the course of this year, and I chose my first one of the bunch to read:

Relax, you're already home:  Everyday Taoist Habits for a Richer Life

By Raymond Barnett, Ph. D.

Taoism

I am well aware that this book is neither the first nor the last one written about Taoism, but overall, I believe that it is a worthwhile read.  Raymond Barnett's plainspoken writing style lends a great deal of accessibility to the content.  It's not a didactic profile of an ancient Chinese religion in any way, but more of an experiential description of the primary precepts behind Taoism.   By relating his own personal experiences and daily practices as someone who has (both academically and spiritually) delved deep into this tradition, the reader receives a very clear and thoughtful presentation of what it means to live a Taoist life.

While just about everything in this book resonated with me on different levels, I was particularly delighted with these three Taoist cornerstones:

1.  CONNECT WITH THE NATURAL WORLD

I have to say that I have always felt more spiritual and connected to God when I have been alone and out in nature than I have ever been at a church or religious gathering.  I could be sitting on a park bench or at the shore of a lake and feel completely in sync with a greater beating pulse.

2.  RELAX AND SIMPLIFY YOUR LIFE

The very word "SIMPLIFY" has become a personal mantra for me over these last few years.  In my life, about 90% of the stress that I've felt in the past was created by all things extraneous, when I was pouring my energy into something that held little value towards my own happiness.  I've been on a constant, soul-searching purge of things both internally and externally that complicate my life and make things miserable.  The result continues to be a lightness of being and a better quality of life.

3.  GET PHYSICAL AND EXERCISE

Barnett says that it is a common sight in China to see crowds of people out in the early morning out walking or practicing Tai Chi.  With Taoism, the body and the spirit are one.  Exercise promotes the flow if Ch'i (energy in all things) and nurtures the Tao (the inherent nature of all things in the universe).  Whether I am simply walking or working out at my gym, physical activity has become a high priority for me and creates a strong foundation for all the ways that I hope to grow and live my life.

These and several other insights in this book validated a lot of what I've already been thinking and practicing in my own personal evolution.  It has been very comforting to know that I am not alone in this path I've been forging.  The Chinese have been practicing all of this for hundreds of years, and that is pretty amazing.

I loved this book and will re-visit it numerous times.  At just under 200 pages, it was a very quick read full of information, including a historical summary of Taoism as it has evolved in Chinese culture over hundreds of years at the very end of the book.  It offers lots of simple and practical suggestions for incorporating Taoism in one's daily life.

I highly recommended this book.  Here are some links to purchase it if you wish:

AMAZON Paperback
AMAZON Kindle/ Digital Edition

In the next installment of Reading Will Save the World, I will offer my impressions of John Steinbeck's colossal, Nobel Prize-winning novel, "The Grapes of Wrath".  I am embroiled in this book right now and will soon be done.  Though I suspect that I'll need to lie down for a while as soon as I'm finished with it.

Go on.  Read a book.  Inform your imagination.  See a different world.  Save us all.

Save yourself.

-Gordon

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Mon, 18 Mar 2013 17:00:25 +0000 http://sett.com/wherepianosroam/uid/53479
Gordon's Annual Pet Peeve List http://sett.com/wherepianosroam/uid/53472 Like many of you, I have my moments when I get a little bothered and frustrated.  Once in a while, I feel like pulling at my very pretty Asian hair, stomping on the ground (doing little pirouettes in the air in between stomps, naturally), and speaking in my Darth Vad]]> Optimus_Header2.jpg

Like many of you, I have my moments when I get a little bothered and frustrated.  Once in a while, I feel like pulling at my very pretty Asian hair, stomping on the ground (doing little pirouettes in the air in between stomps, naturally), and speaking in my Darth Vader Man-Voice as I curse the world and all its spoils!!!

Why?  You ask?  Well, there are certain things that do bother me on a more than regular basis.  Thankfully, there aren't that many, and I use my very calm, inscrutable Asian mystique to get over these little bits of evil.

So, without further ado, I present to you .  .  .

GORDON'S ANNUAL PET PEEVE LIST FOR 2013

10.  Pedestrians who cross the street WHILE I AM DRIVING!

So, in general, I have nothing against pedestrians.  I get it.  They have a zero carbon footprint and get plenty of exercise.  There's fresh air and our natural world to explore.  That's fine and dandy and all, but they often like to jump out into oncoming traffic just to cross the street.  The ones that really annoy me are the pedestrians who do not use crosswalks (or sidewalks!).  As a rule, I like to avoid things that become a danger to themselves and others.  In my book, reckless pedestrians are right up there with reckless bicyclists and reckless drivers.  So, when I get in my car to go somewhere, could you all just stay home?  Please? Pretty Please?

9.  Parents who let their children act like lunatics in public

Kids will be kids.  They often act up because they may not know the best way to communicate their feelings.  Maybe they're tired, hungry, or need attention.  I have no problem with that.  I do, however, have a problem with parents who have no control over their children.

Temper tantrums in the produce department at the supermarket.  Pushing and shoving other children.  Making an absolute mess of a waiting room.  Blood-curdling screaming to high heaven.  I'm not saying that all of this is completely avoidable or that parenting is easy by any means.  But there are plenty of parents in the world who have well-mannered children.  I applaud them for doing the hard work it takes to  establish boundaries and exact some degree of decorum when out in public.  This will bode well for the future self-aware and thoughtful adults that their children will become.

8.  People  who wear pajamas in public

Call me old-fashioned, or being a victim of too many Downton Abbey episodes, but why do some people wear pajamas in public?  I can understand wearing sweats if you just came from the gym or even a bathing suit on a hot summer day, but I have to draw the line at pajamas.  As comfortable as they are, it sets a slovenly and grubby precedent for generations to come.  One's appearance may not be everything, but it can be a reflection of how you respect and care for yourself.  So, in the morning, take off the pajamas and put on a dazzling outfit.  We should not impose limits on being beautiful inside and out.  So, by all means, be beautiful.

7.  Celery

Gross. Just. Gross.

6.  Skinny Jeans

Invariably, skinny jeans only produce the opposite effect of what they seem to imply.  I've thought this many times, and I'm about to say this out loud.  People who aren't skinny should not wear skinny jeans.  Maybe you have curvy hips, fuzzy hairy legs, or very muscular calves.  These are things to be proud of, but they look downright appalling in a pair of skinny jeans.  These jeans try to create a false shape but only succeed in distorting the actual, and quite lovely, shape that's been biologically given.  Oh and by the way, I don't think skinny people look good in skinny jeans either.  Why? Two words:  chicken legs.  Oh and two more:  Not flattering. Oh and three more:  eat a hamburger.

If you want to show off your legs (skinny or otherwise), wear shorts or a pretty A-line skirt with heels.  Don't force them to be something they're not.  Embrace every curve, every inch of soft, fuzzy hair, or that toned calf muscle and show them off!!

Lastly, skinny jeans just don't look comfortable.  I, for example, am a male with male body parts and, to my dismay, have somewhat of a little bubble butt.  The badunkadunk needs to breathe.  My tail feather needs room for shaking.  Enough said.

5.  Ashton Kutcher

Nope, and well, nope.

4.  Faux Country Music

I live in Nashville, the country music capital of the known universe.  As an artist and musician, I bow down at the altar of classic country greats like Dolly Parton, Johnny Cash, and Willie Nelson.  They are part of an acoustic tradition of music that lilts and sways to a graceful twang borne out of real experiences and southern grit.  Flash forward to this modern day when you can't distinguish between a "country" song by Taylor Swift/Carrie Underwood/Lady Antebellum and a pop song by Katy Perry.   The problem is that the more a "country" song sounds like a pop song, the more money it makes.  It's not the tradition that matters any more.  It's all about the greed.  Thankfully, I'll always have Dolly on my record player.

3.  Director Michael Bay

I am a huge Transformers Fan.  In another life, I like to think that I was a small green Toyota pick-up truck that transformed into a badass intergalactic warrior!!  When I heard that they would have their own movie franchise, I was super stoked!  But when I saw the actual films, I was a little mad.  Ok, a lot mad.  Even though the special effects were magnificent and portrayed Optimus Prime as the GOD THAT HE IS, the films lacked depth and a compelling story.  The first of the series showed a lot of promise, but the whole thing just went downhill from there.  Director Michael Bay seems to think that if you just blow stuff up and have a bunch of fight scenes, this will be enough.  Well, they weren't.  The Transformers franchise, in my book, had the potential to be up there with the greats--Star Wars, The Lord of the Rings, and heck, at least as good as the X-men series and Iron Man.   They could have been every thing that their name implies, transformative in every sense, but alas, Mr. Bay spoils the day.  This pretty much pisses me off every time I think about it.  Oh well, I have my Optimus Prime action figure to console me.

2.  People who do not return shopping carts to a kiosk and leave them strewn about the parking lot

I have to admit that this is a strange pet peeve, but it really does bother the bejesus out of me!!!  Why?  Well, a shopping cart, when left unattended, can become a holy terror!!  Just let a huge gust of wind come by and off they go to ram into cars or topple over.  It particularly irks me when one is taking up a parking spot all by itself.  GRRRRRRRR!!!!!  That spot could have been mine!!  TO WANDA!!!!!!!  To all shopping cart users of the world, could you just take a minute to take them over to the kiosk so that it can bond with its shopping cart friends and talk about boys?  This would spare them from witnessing my Asian wrath in the parking lot.  Just sayin'.

1.  Little Monsters

I might actually be referring to real monsters, but seriously, I am referring to the fans of a certain pop star named Lady Gaga.  I have no problem with artists having fans and a healthy following, but I draw the line at a group of people who have a mob, cult-like mentality regarding anything having to do with their savior.  For example, let's say I went over to youtube to watch a Justin Beiber video, and as I hum along to the catchy tune I scroll down to read the comments.  Lo and behold, there they are spewing venom on the lesser Justin (I love you Justin Timberlake, but I digress.).   Can't a pop star just sing his song and show off his abs in peace?     They attack everyone.  Katy Perry, Britney, Ke$ha, Rihanna, and anyone else who could rival the success of their chosen one is spat upon and demoralized.  It's unbelievable and has reached a level of online bullying that is just not necessary.  Of course, it's no secret that I am a huge Madonna fan, and they are particularly cruel to the Queen of Pop.  I also draw the line at Madonna-bashing.  They will rue the day .  .  .

Is it possible to be a fan of an artist and be respectful of other artists and their fans simultaneously?  I certainly hope so.  Besides, whose idea was it to call these people monsters to begin with?  Oh right, I know who.   I hope she knows that it is becoming an unfortunate and rather sad self-fulfilling prophecy.

So there it is!  My Pet Peeve list for 2013!!  I am also preparing my favorite things of 2013 list , and it shall be posted soon.

Thank you for reading and feel free to leave a comment.  I'm curious.  What drives you crazy?

-Gordon

 

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Tue, 12 Mar 2013 01:42:30 +0000 http://sett.com/wherepianosroam/uid/53472
Reflection http://sett.com/wherepianosroam/uid/53474 Sometimes, I allow myself to think back on my life, on the people I've met, the places I've been.  It's been a very steep, and at times arduous, incline.  I'm surprised that I am remarkably well-preserved, in spite of it all.  That I am still more hopeful t]]> in_the_sun

Sometimes, I allow myself to think back on my life, on the people I've met, the places I've been.  It's been a very steep, and at times arduous, incline.  I'm surprised that I am remarkably well-preserved, in spite of it all.  That I am still more hopeful than jaded, more sweet than bitter, more alive than complacent, more in love than in longing, more free than disenfranchised.

I have to tell myself, "You did good kid.  You did good".  The alternative to this would be to obsess over every loss and failure, to give greater credence to the gloom in the doom,  to consume the worst of things.

The truth is I've lived this alternative when, instead of running outside to play in the sun, I turned the other way to explore darker corridors.

I've come to know a couple of things in these meanderings.  First of all, and most essentially, if you stay in these darker places for long enough, things just start to suck.  I could probably be more eloquent in saying that, but it's true.  Darkness just begets more darkness, and before you know it, you've dug yourself into an impossibly deep, abysmal hole.

It's a lonely place that should only be frequented in short visits, if only just to grapple with honest feelings and emotions occasionally.  But to take a permanent residence there would be to give up.  There is nothing worse than giving up.

The other thing I've learned is to not be so quick to judge others.  You never know what cracks lie inside the porcelain.  We all have struggles in our lives.  Some are more obvious than others, and others are so intricately hidden that they are even invisible to oneself.

I might be more forgiving of mean-spirited people because if I had their burden, I might be the same.  Sometimes the best that someone can give is the worst thing that can be given.  That's just life.  I'm not saying that this is right, or even fair.  Some of us are just powerless to the things that consume us.

Maybe it's a sign of maturity or part of getting older because I'm pretty much done with the darkness.  This is not to say that I won't be sad at times because I surely will be, but I like to think that I have a more balanced approach to the abyss.  It's a place I'll visit when circumstances demand it and when the crumbling of things become too much to bear.  But I'll be leaning towards that other end of the corridor in these times, where a screen door creaks open once in a while as the sun seeps through its porous skin.

It takes a certain sense of awareness, a wherewithal, to know not to stay in the presence of darkness for far too long.  Light, luminous warm light, is far kinder and more forgiving.

Imagine being a kid again, when the last thing you want to do is stay cooped up inside all day.  When you're bursting at the seams to go outside and play.  Swing on a swing.  Slide down a slide.  Ride on a bicycle.  Dangle on a monkey bar.  Play with exuberance.  Laugh. Smile.  Bask in the sun.  This is a reality well worth embracing.

I've learned enough not to be afraid of the dark.  I just know to be wary of its nature and only hold its hand once in a while.

-Gordon

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Sat, 02 Mar 2013 12:41:55 +0000 http://sett.com/wherepianosroam/uid/53474
Welcome Kindle Readers!! http://sett.com/wherepianosroam/uid/53471 My blog Where Pianos Roam (WPR) is now officially available and optimized for the Amazon Kindle E-reader.  Yay!!  For those of you who own and do a majority of your reading through your Kindle, you can go to the Kindle Store on your device and sign on to subscri]]> kindle-Logo-550x401

My blog Where Pianos Roam (WPR) is now officially available and optimized for the Amazon Kindle E-reader.  Yay!!  For those of you who own and do a majority of your reading through your Kindle, you can go to the Kindle Store on your device and sign on to subscribe to WPR.  (Just put the words "Where Pianos Roam" in the search field or go HERE)

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This subscription means that for a small monthly fee, each new post will be sent directly to your Kindle whenever one is published.  You won't have to type in a web address in some measly browser.  A brand new WPR post will be waiting for you in your home menu of your Kindle whenever you turn it on!  Cool huh?

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You can subscribe to WPR on the following Kindle Devices:

Kindle
Kindle Touch
Kindle Paperwhite
Kindle Keyboard
Kindle DX
Kindle (2nd Generation)
Kindle (1st Generation)

So, it is with great pride that I welcome all the new Kindle readers to WPR!  We hope you enjoy your stay.  Enjoy the grand vistas.  Creatures great and small, graceful and clumsy, loud and tempered, roam here.

Hugs all around!

-Gordon, Oreo, and Buttercup

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Sun, 24 Feb 2013 15:34:26 +0000 http://sett.com/wherepianosroam/uid/53471