hide

Read Next

What Has Become of the NCAA?

On Imported Blog

Over Christmas break, I watched all of Blue Mountain State on Netflix. It's a raunchy comedy aimed at young men centered around college football players at a stereotypical big state school. It's a hilarious TV show that I would recommend for anyone who enjoys inappropriate and perhaps offensive humor (guilty pleasure, sorry).

During the end of the third and final season, the NCAA (National Collegiate Athletic Association) hits the school with huge penalties for its program. In retaliation, Alex Moran (starting quarterback and main character) fires back by attempting to expose the NCAA and how unfair they are to student-athletes.

Currently, there is a lot of debate going around the amateur status of college athletes, mainly football and basketball players. Football and basketball games are huge sources of revenue for most universities, generating millions of dollars for their programs (the University of Texas generated more than $100 million of revenue in 2011 - 2012).

The athletes don't see any of this, at least not legally. They aren't allowed any compensation besides the scholarships they receive along with perhaps a small living stipend. They aren't allowed to accept free materials (not even cream cheese!). Athletes have often professional-like schedules where their days are packed with practice, training, and film review. Recently, they have started to come together because they believe they should be paid as they are generating tons of revenue for their respective universities.

Phil and Bill - Comparing the greatest NBA and NFL coaches of my life to date.

On The 4 Hour Struggle

Phil Jackson: 6'8", athletic, and charismatic. A former player that had the respect of everyone. 11 rings as a head coach and 2 as a player. A practitioner of Zen Buddhism.

Bill Belichick -- Too small to play football, son of a coach and scout. Uncharismatic, but has been studying film since he was 9 years old. He gained respect by his knowledge of the game. 4 rings as a head coach and 2 as a defensive coordinator.

Jackson was a master of dealing with egos. In the NBA, guys like Kobe, Jordan, Shaq, don't come around very often. So as a head coach, it is much more difficult to have only "your type of guys" if you want to win an NBA championship when compared to the NFL.

When Chicago was going on their 2nd run, they recognized a need for interior defense. After clearing it with Scottie and Michael, they traded for Dennis Rodman and Phil assimilated the enigmatic player into a key piece in the 1996-98 3peat.

Rendering New Theme...