Mike Dariano

hide

Read Next

My 12 favorite Non-fiction books of 2013

After a shorter than expected list of fiction I had read this year, my non-fiction list was a touch longer than I thought. I ended up reading 24 non-books in 2013, and some were very good. I was going to make this list all inclusive, but decided against it. I'll offer a few comments about my favorite 12 and include a few at the end with a single thought.

There were two types of books I read this year. The first were books about the human journey. From Wall Street riches to cold Michigan winters, from happiness in NYC, to minimalism that springs up in Ohio, to homeschooling in California. The topics of these books was varied, but the structure of a journey was not.

The second, and smaller set of books, was more academic. These books were synthesis of academic articles, expert interviews, and breaking research to create a worldview worth considering. While I enjoyed the journey stories more, these books were ones that I could read again and gather even more good information.

As with my fiction list, I started many more books than just these, but these were the ones I finished and enjoyed quite a bit.

Books about a human journey.

Harnessing the Human Need For Consistency For Good

On SEBASTIAN MARSHALL

To make a really long story really short, people feel an emotional need to be consistent with what they publicly commit to. Especially what they write about.

Do you know about the human need for consistency? I'm not going to explain it in detail here, I'm going to assume you already know the basics. If you don't, you probably should drop whatever you're doing for the next few hours and go read up on some articles about it because it has a massive impact on the entire world.

Here's a very brief overview:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Consistency_(negotiation)

In negotiation, consistency, or the consistency principle, refers to a negotiator's strong psychological need to be consistent with prior acts and statements.

Rendering New Theme...