like an apple

Crackers, rice, lentils, meat, but I would rather eat, a poem, like an apple.

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Friday Found Poem: Mr. Mezei on the Island

This week's "found poem" is another one crafted from a legal case.

The case is a really interesting situation that happened during the second "red scare" in the U.S., in the 1950s. Mezei, a Romanian/Hungarian man had lived here in the US legally for 25 years, as a permanent resident (i.e., he had what everybody calls a "green card," though it is not green now). He left the US to try to visit his dying mother in Romania but was denied entry and then had trouble getting permission to leave Hungary. He finally got permission to leave Hungary, and was granted a visa at the American consulate for entry to the U.S.

But when he actually arrived at Ellis Island, the U.S. government denied him entry, as a threat to national security. The government refused to disclose why it thought Mezei was a threat. Unfortunately, no other country in the world was willing to take Mezei in, especially now that the U.S. deemed him a threat but refused to say why.

Mezei sued, demanding a chance to hear the evidence against him and respond, to try to prove it was safe to let him go back to his home in New York. He argued that keeping him on Ellis Island was depriving him of his liberty without "due process of law," in violation of the constitution.

As you'll see in the poem, Mezei lost the case. The court's opinion has a single chilling line that has always stood out to me, from the first time I read it: "Whatever the procedure authorized by Congress is, it is due process as far as an alien denied entry is concerned."

What Happens in the Ukraine, Should Not Stay in the Ukraine

On Flower Power

In a nutshell, this is what happened:

The amount of UNH students who are unaware of what is going on in the Ukraine is too damn high. While sipping on $1 beers and munching on $0.25 wings Thursday night, I explained to my friends what is happening in the Ukraine. With the aid of plenty body movement and letting my hands speak too, I was able to not lose their interest within the first minute. It’s important to know what happens around you, even if you’re not in near proximity of events with an impact. For instance, the situation in the Ukraine doesn’t only affect Ukrainians. As you read on, you will realize that global political relations, international laws and economy are influenced as well.

Plus, it’ll make you sounds smart when you talk to people older than you. Knowing about current events can help you form your own, polarized opinions that set you apart from the rest. Here’s what you need to know about the Ukrainian revolution.

The Ukraine had been under Soviet control back in the glory days of the Soviet Union. Ever since the union didn’t work out, the country had been trying to get back on its financial feet but struggled. For a while now, many Ukrainians aspired to join the European Union in order to prosper its economy and take advantage of other benefits of being a member. Imagine the anger felt by these people when President Yanukovych rejected a far-reaching accord with the EU in November 2013 because of his strong ties with Russia. Overnight, protests broke out into the Independence Square, known as the Maidan, in the capital of Kiev. The BBC reports that since it began, developments include, “police attacks on student protesters, severe new anti-protest laws, and the abduction and beating of opposition activists – caused the demonstrations spread and intensify.”

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