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Boston Weekend Roundup/Week Preview 8/16-17

On Boston Sports Daily

Patriots –

On Friday night the Patriots took on the Eagles and I told you a couple things to look for. Here are some results and some other things that come to mind after the 42-35 win.

The quarterbacks played pretty well, especially Tom Brady. Overall, Brady, Jimmy Garoppolo, and Ryan Mallett combined to go 21/33 for 226 yards with 4 touchdowns and 1 interception. The interception of course was the result of a lineman-turned-tight end who blatantly ran the wrong route and left Brady out to dry. Other than that it was smooth sailing for the passing game. Garoppolo did get the nod to come out second and he exceled in his role and it looks like Mallett has one more foot out the door despite his performance.

The wide receivers were solid once again. Aaron Dobson didn’t see any time just coming off the PUP list, but preseason week 1 standout Brian Tyms caught 3 balls on 7 targets including a touchdown. He showed once again that he wants to be a part of this team and with the time that Belichick gave him, it looks like he’s reciprocated the feeling. The two receivers that Brady looked to the most were Kenbrell Thompkins and Julian Edelman, not so different from last year, but it’s a matter of time before Brandon LaFell becomes more prevalent given his rapport with the younger QBs.

Industry Awakens to Threat of Climate Change

On The Perfectly Flaky Hawk

WASHINGTON — Coca-Cola has always been more focused on its economic bottom line than on global warming, but when the company lost a lucrative operating license in India because of a serious water shortage there in 2004, things began to change.

Today, after a decade of increasing damage to Coke’s balance sheet as global droughts dried up the water needed to produce its soda, the company has embraced the idea of climate change as an economically disruptive force.

“Increased droughts, more unpredictable variability, 100-year floods every two years,” said Jeffrey Seabright, Coke’s vice president for environment and water resources, listing the problems that he said were also disrupting the company’s supply of sugar cane and sugar beets, as well as citrus for its fruit juices. “When we look at our most essential ingredients, we see those events as threats.”

Coke reflects a growing view among American business leaders and mainstream economists who see global warming as a force that contributes to lower gross domestic products, higher food and commodity costs, broken supply chains and increased financial risk. Their position is at striking odds with the longstanding argument, advanced by the coal industry and others, that policies to curb carbon emissions are more economically harmful than the impact of climate change.

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